Staying Underground
"Where The Future Culture Is Found"

..a Mistah Rapsey experience.

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Tags: Music | Mixtapes | Quotes | Graffiti | 88til | G'd Up

Love is an Action. Love is the Answer. Love is the Movement.

Nas and Damian Marley talk Distant Relatives, Africa + more

Two hood scholars that have kept it real in the proper sense of the meaning  from the beginning..

Tiken Jah Fakoly // Je Dis Non

Tiken Jah Fakoly plays music “to wake up the consciences”. His music speaks about many injustices done to the people of his country, and those over Africa. As such, many African listeners feel a deep affinity with his lyrics as Fakoly speaks for oppressed people. This connection has helped make Tiken Jah Fakoly a much-listened artist throughout the world.

“It’s a historic moment for Africa. We’re gonna take a road trip through it.”
These are the words of Ziggy Marley, eldest son of reggae superstar Bob  Marley and heir to one of the most legendary families in music, on the  historic motorcycle trip he took to Africa with his brothers, Rohan and  Robbie, during World Cup 2010: the first-ever World Cup to be held in  Africa.

“It’s a historic moment for Africa. We’re gonna take a road trip through it.”

These are the words of Ziggy Marley, eldest son of reggae superstar Bob Marley and heir to one of the most legendary families in music, on the historic motorcycle trip he took to Africa with his brothers, Rohan and Robbie, during World Cup 2010: the first-ever World Cup to be held in Africa.

Ziggy, Rohan & Robbie Marley planning their African road trip

I love listening to them talk, they sound so happy.  Hopefully one day I will have the opportunity to have a conversation with one or all of them.

Blitz the Ambassador // Native Sun (Full Album Streaming)

Native Sun, Blitz the Ambassador’s second studio album, is a mix of highlife, afrobeat, and hip hop. Born and raised in Accra, Ghana, Blitz and his band, the Embassy Ensemble, bring a new sound to international music. Native Sun, will be released May 3rd in North America, and May 6th Worldwide.

besottedbyfillintheblank said: Oh, I like this!

Bob Marley & Pascaline Bongo ‘Princess of Gabon’
LargeUp scores an exclusive interview with Kevin MacDonald–most famous until now for the Forrest Whittaker vehicle Last King of Scotland but about to become more famous for Marley, his documentary on the one and only Bob Marley (which hits big and small screens today). Both the film and Jesse Serwer‘s Q&A cut deep, touching on aspects of Bob’s life which–amazingly, for one of the most famous figures of our era–have never come to light until now. Those include his final days and his struggle  with cancer (the subject of innumerable conspiracy theories) his torubled friendship with football star Alan “Skilly” Cole and his relationship with Pascaline Bongo (pictured with Bob, above) the ‘Princess of Gabon’ who invited him to play in Africa for the very first time. Pretty riveting stuff for any serious Marley fan. Read a short excerpt below and click the links below for the full interview, as well as video of Bob’s historic performance at Zimbabwe’s Independence celebrations, recorded thirty-two years ago–almost to the day (April 17th, 1980).

LU: How did you come on that story of the princess of Gabon?
KM: I had been told by a few people that she had been very important in the last years of his life, in introducing him to Africa. The first time he played in Africa he was invited by her father but her, really. That seemed like a key point in his life. Obviously Africa means so much to him. I thought here’s a bizarre story, a strange individual in this incredibly luxurious environment and you feel like that’s a million miles from Trenchtown, so that appealed to me. They’d had a relationship that went beyond just a girlfriend relationship, I think she’d been also instrumental in a couple things in his life. She visited him in Germany before he died.

»Read more (via LargeUp)
»Watch video of Bob Marley’s historic Zimbabwe Concert

Bob Marley & Pascaline Bongo ‘Princess of Gabon’

LargeUp scores an exclusive interview with Kevin MacDonald–most famous until now for the Forrest Whittaker vehicle Last King of Scotland but about to become more famous for Marley, his documentary on the one and only Bob Marley (which hits big and small screens today). Both the film and Jesse Serwer‘s Q&A cut deep, touching on aspects of Bob’s life which–amazingly, for one of the most famous figures of our era–have never come to light until now. Those include his final days and his struggle  with cancer (the subject of innumerable conspiracy theories) his torubled friendship with football star Alan “Skilly” Cole and his relationship with Pascaline Bongo (pictured with Bob, above) the ‘Princess of Gabon’ who invited him to play in Africa for the very first time. Pretty riveting stuff for any serious Marley fan. Read a short excerpt below and click the links below for the full interview, as well as video of Bob’s historic performance at Zimbabwe’s Independence celebrations, recorded thirty-two years ago–almost to the day (April 17th, 1980).

LU: How did you come on that story of the princess of Gabon?

KM: I had been told by a few people that she had been very important in the last years of his life, in introducing him to Africa. The first time he played in Africa he was invited by her father but her, really. That seemed like a key point in his life. Obviously Africa means so much to him. I thought here’s a bizarre story, a strange individual in this incredibly luxurious environment and you feel like that’s a million miles from Trenchtown, so that appealed to me. They’d had a relationship that went beyond just a girlfriend relationship, I think she’d been also instrumental in a couple things in his life. She visited him in Germany before he died.

»Read more (via LargeUp)

»Watch video of Bob Marley’s historic Zimbabwe Concert

Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned: That until there are no longer first-class and second class citizens of any nation; That until the color of a man’s skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes; That until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race; That until that day, the dream of lasting peace and world citizenship and the rule of international morality will remain but a fleeting illusion, to be pursued but never attained.

- Haile Selassie I

excerpt from Address to the United Nations, 
New York City, NY  (Oct 4, 1963)

Life is like a Market Place by Nana Kofi Acquah
How I wish we all will always remember that life is like a market place, you come, you look, you chat, you buy, you go and another person comes, looks, chats, buys and goes. Nobody stays in the market place forever.
I hope our leaders (and all of us, actually) will never forget that Life is really like a market place… and finally when we get home, they will ask us “So what did you bring from the market?”
Blog excerpt and photo courtesy of Nana Kofi Acquah's amazing photography blog, A Window to Ghana and Africa, which I recommend paying attention to.

Life is like a Market Place by Nana Kofi Acquah

How I wish we all will always remember that life is like a market place, you come, you look, you chat, you buy, you go and another person comes, looks, chats, buys and goes. Nobody stays in the market place forever.

I hope our leaders (and all of us, actually) will never forget that Life is really like a market place… and finally when we get home, they will ask us “So what did you bring from the market?”

Blog excerpt and photo courtesy of Nana Kofi Acquah's amazing photography blog, A Window to Ghana and Africa, which I recommend paying attention to.

Ella and Billie back in Africa street art series by Miss Me.